Sunderland Pianoforte Society Review

 

THE SUNDERLAND Pianoforte Society season continued with a recital given by the brilliant young Russian pianist Alexander Panfilov who is winning many major prizes worldwide. Competitions in England include the Brant and James Mottram and, earlier this month, Alexander won first prize and audience prize at the Hastings International Piano Competition. An experienced and professional performer, he did not disappoint...
 

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Manchester Recital Review

 

On this performance, Alexander Panfilov is a pianist of proficiency and power who possesses, as well, a rare, wholly unexpected delicacy of touch.

The first piece, Bach’s Partita No 1 in B flat major, showed the excellence of his technique.  However, it was his performance of the works following, Schumann’s Etudes Symphoniques and Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky, the latter coming after the interval, that gave an indication of his full, formidable range.  And in the midst of this, as intimated, there was a nuance and a delicacy that was often startling.

Panfilov was generous with his gifts: three encores followed.  He is aptly named as well, I feel: a pianist who is destined to conquer worlds.


Hastings Competition Review

 

Playing with the Royal Philharmonic Concert Orchestra, the 25-year-old drew a huge response from the enthusiastic full house. It was no surprise that in addition to the first prize awarded by the distinguished international jury, he also won the audience prize.

 

“I still cannot fully believe that it has happened,” Alexander said afterwards...

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Amati Magazine Interview

 

A pianist in the grand Russian tradition, Alexander Panfilov hails from Moscow, where he was a pupil at the Gnessin School of Music. Later he won a scholarship to the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester and scooped its Gold Medal in 2014. Soon he’s off to the Leeds International Piano Competition…

Alex, what are your earliest musical memories and how did you first get interested in music?

I come from a non-musical family. My father, though, once brought home a CD in a new format that was becoming popular at the time (MP3!): JS Bach’s Mass in B minor and the complete Passions. Perhaps this was a strange choice for a little boy, but the music impressed me so much that I would listen to it over and over, every day. The same happened when I first heard Mozart’s operas. My first-ever impression of piano music was Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No.1 – and I realised that was the instrument for me...

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